Header


Mesothelioma compensation is awarded to the plaintiff when the defendant in such a suit admits or is found liable causing the disease. Seeking such compensation should always be of primary concern to those afflicted with this form of cancer. Yet, many do not seek their just compensation. Why is this? A common misconception about mesothelioma or other medical related lawsuits is that they are intended to seek "revenge" for being made ill. Such an assessment is an obtuse one on many levels. The reason the afflicted seek a settlement or judgment is because of the enormous costs associated with suffering from the disease. Mesothelioma is a serious condition as it is a form of cancer derived from exposure to asbestos. Often, the exposure is derived from negligence. One form of negligence would be a building's owner or management did not properly screen for mesothelioma and those in the building suffered from exposure. It is also not without precedent that those working in asbestos removal suffered from their exposure due to faulty protective equipment. Regardless of the reason the exposure, mesothelioma is life threatening. To send mesothelioma into remission will require all manner of financial costs. This is the main reason why mesothelioma compensation needs to be sought after - the fees associated with medical bills need to be covered. Without the best of care, it would become much harder to reverse the condition. Again, this is why seeking monetary awards is so important. The costs associated with treatment are so enormous funding said costs is a must if proper treatment is needed. And why shouldn't those that are responsible for the onset of the condition be held liable for its costs? Once again, these costs can be considered significant. In addition to medical treatment, bills can amass from other sources as well... Depending upon the current stage of the disease, the afflicted may not be able to work. While being legitimately unable to work may evoke sympathy from some, the situation does not automatically come with a waiver for financial responsibilities. Without a viable stream of money, financial stress is bound to increase significantly. Effective payments through a lawsuit or settlement could significantly alleviate the pressure associated with such financial strain. Another area of mesothelioma compensation that needs to be addressed would be that of pain and suffering. Having to deal with extreme pain and discomfort mesothelioma causes may justify high financial compensation rewards. The law had remedies in place for those dealing with such suffering and it comes in the form of civil judgments. Those suffering from such a condition are well within their rights to seek such payments. Questions will arise over the amount of compensation that can be awarded. Blanket answers to such questions are not really valid. There are no clear and set rewards for mesothelioma compensation. Some judgments are rather large and others can be modest. There are simply too many factors that weigh into how awards are made. The key point here is that the afflicted seek out a qualified and experienced attorney that specializes in these types of cases. Doing so will increase the likelihood that proper payment is achieved. Payment can come in two forms. The first would be an out of court settlement and the other would be a judgment in the aftermath of a civil case. One is not better than the other and the decision to accept settlement vs. take the case to civil court. There are a significant number of factors that can go into the decision making process regarding how a particular litigation should move forward. Determining which direction to follow will be based on the litigant's situation and needs as well as the advice of legal counsel. Regardless of your own individual situation, all those involved with a mesothelioma case must seek the best outcome for their needs. In short, they should seek the maximum amount of financial award which can be acquired in a manner the litigant is most comfortable pursuing. Discussing your specific options with a qualified attorney will boost the likelihood that you follow the proper course of action for your needs and requirements. Seeking mesothelioma compensation is a process that should not be taken lightly. There are a great many complexities involved and making the right decisions will factor into your ability to receive just and equitable judgments. That is why proper deliberation must go into the process. Doing otherwise could limit claims immensely. Leigh White invites you to check out her site about Mesothelioma Compensation [http://mesotheliomacompensationx.com] where she is working on more articles like this one. Among the rare form of cancer known to human nowadays is the malignant mesothelioma. It is a cancer developed in the mesothelium, the protective lining that covers many of the body's internal organs. The cause of this cancer is the exposure to asbestos.For this reason mesothelioma compensation is collected form asbestos related matter. Asbestos is mostly found in construction materials. It is also considered to be an ideal material because it is cheap, known to have high electrical resistance, good fire retardant and easy to use. There are advantages of using asbestos, however; human health is at risk. Asbestos when absorbed or inhaled by the exposed person can cause various diseases, one of which is the mesothelioma. Due to its microscopic nature (asbestos dust), the lungs cannot expel them, and since it is sharp, it can easily penetrate to the cell and damage it. The most common victims of mesothelioma and other diseases are the employees involved in the production and construction of materials with asbestos. For this reason, mesothelioma compensation are collected from employer. Most, if not all, of the affected employees files or pursue legal actions to claim benefits and financial support from their employer to help them address expenses like hospital/medical bills, loss of income and daily living funds. The mesothelioma compensation can be from small amount to substantial amount depending on the amount of damages. As for the settlement between the plaintiff (employee) and defendant (employer), once the plaintiff's attorney files the proper papers for the asbestos lawsuit, the defendant can act or respond in a number of ways. Settlements can be out-of-court or in-court. If the defendant wishes to settle the issue out-of-court, their lawyer will talk to the plaintiffs lawyer and discuss the terms and agreement both beneficial to them for mesothelioma compensation. If the defendant wishes to involve the power of the law between them, then they can settle in-court. It will be discussed over court trial together with the judges and other verdict. At the end of the trial, the defendant may be judged guilty or not guilty. The case of mesothelioma compensation has no standard, it is dependent on the agreed sum of money the defendant has to give considering all the financial factors like medical bills, etc. mesothelioma compensation

Petit Fours

I used to roll my eyes at Mother’s Day and voice unoriginal complaints about how it’s a “Hallmark holiday,” but now that I’m a mom? I’ll take that Hallmark card and those flowers, thank you very much, and I wouldn’t say no to a box of chocolates, either. I had a fantastic Mother’s Day yesterday—the highlight was probably watching my two-year-old giggle as he helped carry the breakfast tray to me in bed, then having him cheer, “Eat, Mama! Happy Mother’s!” (He always forgets to add the “Day” at the end.) I hope all of the mothers out there had wonderful days as well!
When I was a starry-eyed pastry pup, I dreamed about opening my own bakery that would sell only miniature desserts. That would be the cutest, right? I imagined the big glass display cases full of mini cupcakes, tarts, macarons, petit fours, and brownie bites, each adorably displayed and packaged. In retrospect, of course, this is kind of a terrible idea. With years of experience under my belt, and knowing what I now know about price points and labor costs and how many dang mini tarts I would have to sell to just break even, I think it’s a very good thing I never went through with this plan…but I do still sometimes think about how cute my imaginary mini bakery would have been.

Ingredients
For the Pound Cake:
  • 9 oz cake flour (2 1/4 cups)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 8 ounces butter at room temperature
  • 8 ounces cream cheese at room temperature
  • 15 3/4 oz granulated sugar (2 1/4 cups)
  • 5 eggs at room temperature
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

To Assemble:
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 tbsp vanilla extract
  • 13 oz raspberry jam (1 1/2 cups)
  • 1 1/4 cups vanilla frosting (homemade or store-bought)
  • 7 oz marzipan (optional, see Note)
  • 3 lbs poured fondant (see Note)

Instructions
To Make the Pound Cake:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a 18x12-inch rimmed baking sheet (half-sheet size) with parchment, and spray with nonstick cooking spray. Sift together the cake flour and salt.
  2. Combine the butter, cream cheese, and sugar in the bowl of a large stand mixer. Beat them together on medium-high speed until very light and fluffy, 3-4 minutes. Reduce the speed to medium and add the eggs one at a time, beating for 1 minute after each addition. Add the vanilla extract. Finally, turn the speed to low and add the cake flour, mixing until just a few streaks of flour remain.
  3. Stop the mixer and finish mixing by hand, scraping the bottom and sides of the bowl and stirring well. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth it into an even layer.
  4. Bake the cake for about 20 minutes, until it’s golden brown and it springs back when touched lightly with the fingertips. Let it cool completely at room temperature. The cake can be made several days ahead of time; wrap it well in cling-wrap if you’re making it in advance.
To Assemble the Petit Fours:
  1. Make a vanilla simple syrup by combining 1 cup of water and the sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the sugar dissolves, then bring the mixture to a boil. Once it boils, remove the pan from the heat and stir in the vanilla extract. Let it cool to room temperature while you prepare the cake. Have your room temperature frosting and room temperature raspberry jam ready.
  2. Flip the cake upside-down onto a cutting board and peel off the piece of parchment. Cut the cake into six rectangles by cutting the cake across the middle lengthwise, then cutting it into thirds widthwise. Use a long serrated knife to carefully cut each rectangle into two thin layers (like you would cut a cake into layers) so that you’re left with 12 thin rectangles.
  3. Brush one rectangle with the simple syrup mixture. Dollop on a spoonful of raspberry jam, and spread it in a thin layer over the cake. You want enough jam so that the flavor comes through, but not so much that the cake is unstable. Top the jam with another cake slice, and brush it with more simple syrup. Top this cake layer with a thin layer of frosting, about the same height as one of the cake layers. Brush one more cake layer with simple syrup, then place it, syrup side-down, on top of the buttercream. You should now have a 3-tiered rectangle of cake. Set it aside and repeat this process with the remaining cake layers, until you have four rectangles of assembled cake.
  4. If you're using marzipan, divide the marzipan in four pieces and roll each into a very thin layer—it should be so thin it is almost translucent. Brush the top of one of the rectangles with a bit of simple syrup, and press the marzipan on top. Trim the edges so the marzipan is flush with the sides of the cake, and repeat until all of the cake rectangles are covered with marzipan. Refrigerate the tray to firm up the cake rectangles, for about 45 minutes.
  5. Once firm, use a round cutter to cut small circles out of the cake, about 1 – 1 1/2 inches across. If the cake layers are taller than the cutter, try pressing the cutter down until it is flush with the top of the cake, then using a paring knife to trim around the bottom—this prevents the top of your petit fours from getting dented or smashed when you try to press the cutter to the bottom of the cake. Alternately, you can cut them into small squares instead with a large sharp knife. Place the petit fours on a baking sheet and freeze them until firm, about 1-2 hours. The petit fours should be very hard before you dip them.
  6. Warm up your fondant in the microwave until it is very warm and very fluid—it should readily pour from a spoon. Warm it in 30-second intervals, stirring after every 30 seconds to prevent it from overheating. You will need to warm up the fondant fairly frequently during the dipping, so it’s easiest if you work near the microwave.
  7. Take the tray of cake from the freezer. Press a wooden barbeque skewer through the bottom of one of the pieces, until it is firmly in the middle but not poking through the top. Dip the top of the cake into the fondant at a 45-degree angle and swirl it around. Use a spoon to pour fondant on the sides of the cake as you twirl it. Remove it from the fondant, let the excess drip back into the bowl, and use a spoon to touch up any areas that were missing fondant. Take a fork and put it under the piece of cake, twist the skewer to remove it so the cake is resting on the fork, then gently set the cake onto a wire cooling rack to set. (Refer to the video linked in the Notes section for a visual demonstration of this step.) Repeat until all of the pieces of cake are dipped. If the fondant gets too thick, re-warm it in brief intervals in the microwave. Once the fondant is set, use a sharp knife to carefully loosen them from the wire rack. If desired, you can top them with a pinch of disco dust or sprinkles when the fondant is still wet, or press a bit of edible gold leaf on top of the fondant once it is dry.
Recipe Notes
Marzipan is an optional component in this recipe, but it will give the tops of your petit fours a smoother, more polished look, and add a bit of almond flavor. If you'd like to use it, Odense brand is often available in 7-oz tubes in the baking section of many supermarkets. Here is a recipe if you want to try making your own marzipan.

I cheated a bit and bought my poured fondant from a local cake supply place. If you don’t have access to a cake supply store, it’s actually easy to make at home—here is the recipe I recommend using. There are also other recipes that use powdered sugar instead of a cooked sugar syrup. I’ve had less success using those, but if you want to give it a try, here is a recipe from Wilton for a powdered sugar-based fondant. And finally, here is a video of someone demonstrating the dipping technique I described in the recipe.

More Deliciouse Recipe Petit Fours @ sugarhero.com

Subscribe to receive free email updates:

0 Response to "Petit Fours"

Post a Comment